Tag Archives: Disability

Review: myHailo Call Alert for Refuelling Your Car

As a disabled driver and wheelchair user, refuelling my car has always been a bit of a challenge, and not the most dignified of experiences.

I always try to make sure that I never run too low on petrol and tend to use the same fuel stations for filling up. I have found that the smaller petrol stations do not always have someone on hand to come and assist me, which can be really inconvenient, especially if I am running low on fuel. Once I am at the petrol station, I have to make sure that I use one of the refuelling points near the forecourt window, so that the staff can see me, which can mean a bit of a wait if the station is busy. I then have to loudly blast my horn to try to catch their attention, whilst frantically waving my blue badge at them.

This always creates confusion and a huge amount of attention from other drivers, wondering what I am doing. I am not one to enjoy attention so I have found this quite hard to do but I have had to just grit my teeth and get on with it. One of my local stations has revamped their forecourt and I can no longer see the staff properly so I have to call them on my mobile, but if the tills are busy, they don’t always answer the phone!

Finally, when the assistants do appear, they are always very helpful and once they have filled the tank, I pay with my credit card. My card is authorised with a signature, rather than a pin, so that the attendant can take the payment without me having to get out of the car.

I recently came across myHailo,  a call alert system for disabled drivers needing to refuel their car, which has been fairly recently launched and is being rolled out to petrol stations around the country. Perfect!

So, once I had received myHailo key fob, I went to my nearest Sainsbury’s, who I was delighted to find had signed up to the scheme. This time, I parked at one of the pumps at the rear of the petrol station, turned off my engine and then pressed the button on the fob. A receiver at the front of the forecourt, above the shop, flashed red. I could see that this immediately alerted the staff and with a discreet wave of my blue badge they located me and immediately came out to serve me. As soon as they had received the alert, the receiver then flashed green, to reassure me that they were on their way.

It was a lovely feeling, to not have to blast my horn and create havoc as I normally do and to have such a quick response from the staff was impressive. I would really recommend myHailo to other disabled drivers and also to anyone who is elderly and finds it difficult to get in and out of the car. It is also reassuring that the scheme is endorsed by Disabled Motoring UK.

MyHailo can be purchased for £14.95 and you can check as to whether myHailo is available at your local fuel station by visiting their myHailo zone page. If it isn’t, then talk to your local petrol station and suggest that they install it, or myHailo have a letter that you can print out from their website to hand to them, to suggest the scheme.

By coincidence, I also received a promotion in the post this morning from Shell drivers club, about their new Fill Up & Go App which enables you to pay for your fuel as you fill your tank, without having to go to the tills. Take a look at the video below to see how it works – I have yet to try it.

 

Life is slowly getting easier for us disabled peeps and it is the little things, like hassle free refuelling of your car that make a big difference. Happy motoring folks :)

By Katherine, designed2enable.co.uk

 

 

 

 

Product News: Ponte Giulio WC / Washroom Area Kit

accessible bathroom kit

Ponte Giulio W.C./Washroom Kit

Did you know that with the requirements of the DDA (Disability Discrimination Act), there is now a legal requirement for businesses to provide inclusive washroom facilities for all?

The provision of accessible washrooms has definitely come a long way in the last few years and the major supermarkets and department stores seem to have met the brief but there are still many smaller businesses that have yet to take the DDA requirements on board.

Ponte Giulio have therefore created this kit solution that fits the bill and can easily be installed into a washroom, consisting of five straight Prestigio grab rails and one hinged rail, a cushioned back rest for added safety and a mirror assembly kit. 

Ponte Giulio Prestigio straight safety grab rail bar range

Ponte Giulio Prestigio Grab Rail Colours

The washroom kit solution is ideal for restaurants, tea rooms, pubs, offices, shops, cafes, car sales showrooms etc., and the rails are available in a range of colour options. Coloured grab bars are particularly helpful for the visually impaired  and those with dementia (red or blue). However, we have personally come across accessible washrooms that have been well equipped but are then used by the company for storage for high chairs or other such equipment and then there is an embarrassing few minutes which the staff have to clear the room to make it usable again, which is not really recommended!

Ponte Giulio prestigio safety folding up grab rail

Ponte Giulio Prestigio Folding Safety Rails

The WC / Washroom Kit can also be used just as easily in your home, if you need the extra safety and support that is provided in this complete kit solution for yourself, friend / family member. The grab bars can also be purchased, without the mirror assembly kit and back support, if that is all that is required.

Further information is available here

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Post – Accomable recommend their top accessible city breaks

Accomable logo

Srin Madipalli, CEO and Co-founder of Accomable.com, the ‘Airbnb for disabled people’, shares his top tips for the best accessible city breaks in 2017.

Wheelchair accessible Barcelona

Barcelona City Centre

Barcelona –best for couples, culture vultures and foodies

Travel as a wheelchair user is rarely straightforward, but last summer I came to the conclusion that Barcelona is probably the most fun and accessible place in Europe I’ve visited.

First up: Barcelona has it all: iconic sights (tick!), a beautiful beach (tick!), lovely people and even better food (all present and correct!). Flights are plentiful and cheap and once you arrive, pretty much all of these attractions are accessible – from easy access to Gaudi’s famous Sagrada Familia to wheelchair friendly walkways along the beach (and free beach wheelchairs available too!).

Sagrada Familia Barcelona

Sagrada Familia

There is an awesome adapted apartment in Barcelona: MICs Sant Jordi is a block of cool, brilliantly adapted accessible apartments near the city centre of Barcelona. It’s simple, stylish and budget friendly too.

Finally, lots of the public transport is wheelchair accessible, including the Metro. This actually blew me away.

Discover more Barcelona accessible accommodation online.

Winchester – best for nature lovers, history buffs and foodies

Winchester was voted the best place to live in the UK last year, and it’s easy to see why, with its grand cathedral, excellent independent shops and thriving foodie scene.

The best way to explore is to follow the mile long accessible trail through Winchester, which takes you along the high street, into the cathedral (the ground floor is accessible) and onto Winchester College and Wolvesey Castle.

There is a good, budget accessible hotel in Winchester city centre, but if you have a car, there are some fantastic luxury options in the surrounding countryside, including one of my favourites, Wallops Wood.

Accessible accommodation  Winchester

Interior of Wallops Wood, Winchester

Discover more Winchester accessible accommodation online.

Amsterdam – best for art lovers, activity junkies and easy Eurostar access

city of Amsterdam

What with all the crazy cyclists, cobbled streets and tram tracks, you might not consider Amsterdam to be a great accessible destination. But think again, because the city has some brilliant accessible offerings, with many wheelchair-friendly trams and buses, and easy access to world class museums like the Rijksmuseum.

Check out the Blue Boat Company for accessible tours on the canals or join the locals with one of Star Bikes’ specially adapted cycles.

Star Bikes amsterdam

Star Bike Hire

There’s lots of good accessible accommodation in Amsterdam to fit a variety of tastes and budgets. Plus, if you’d prefer not to fly, you can get there by ferry from Harwich or by train by taking the Eurostar to Belgium and then changing trains and taking the Thalys service to Amsterdam.

Discover more about Amsterdam accessible accommodation online.

For more information on Accomable or to book an accessible stay, visit www.accomable.com

Guest Blog: By Gemma Flanagan for Models of Diversity #disabilityfight4fashionright Tour

 

Gemma Tour2

Gemma Flanagan

I am like most Liverpool lovelies, I love fashion and feeling glamorous is not just a description, it is a way of life. Things changed a bit for me in 2011, when I was diagnosed with Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS), which left me in hospital for the best part of a year fighting against it and then in intensive rehabilitation. As a result of my illness I can no longer walk or stand unaided & rely mainly on a wheelchair. Throughout my life, fashion has always been a massive part of who I am and something I enjoy spending time on, so why should it not still be now. Like millions of others living with disabilities, I buy the magazines, brands and products but we are in no way represented by them…why not?!? In this day and age it is crazy that we are still discriminated against in this way.

It is so hard to believe that in 2015, we are still having to fight against discrimination and inequality. But this is exactly what we at Models of Diversity (http://www.modelsofdiversity.org) are doing. The amazing Angel Sinclair (CEO of Models of Diversity), started up MOD in 2008, and since has been tirelessly campaigning for more diversity within fashion. I discovered this not for profit organisation a few years ago, and it has really been a saviour to me. Meeting Angel and all the team, I discovered that despite my outward appearance and abilities changing, I was still me and was able to pursue modelling now as a model with disabilities.

Chelsey Jay, from Essex, the Director for disabled models has used a wheelchair for a number of years as a result of a condition she developed called POTS (Postural Tachycardia syndrome), through which she faints if she attempts to stand up. Chelsey has worked so hard in trying to bring about change for the better, through pushing boundaries with brands and labels, arranging meetings with head offices and getting our name out there through media. Despite her determination unfortunately we are still battling.

Gemma Tour4

Gemma and Chelsea Jay

To try and stop the inequality for good, Chelsey and Angel came up with the idea for a campaign which will hopefully change the inequality in fashion for good. The campaign will involve us touring around the UK to major cities, gaining the support of the public. Chelsey has got the backing of Kate Green MP who has helped put together a petition, meaning once we obtain enough signatures and present it to parliament, attention will have to be given to this matter. This would mean that disabled models would be used as regularly as any other model. Once we have the signatures required we can present it to parliament showing we have the support of the public and we would then need to be listened to seriously.

Gemma Tour1

Together with Chelsey and myself, our #disabilityfight4fashionright tour is made up of two other gorgeous models. Elesha Turner, from Hastings who relies on a crutch after having major surgery to battle cancer in her thigh bone has had a major successes worldwide since becoming a model with disabilities. And also Katie Knowles, from Newcastle who uses a crutch after spinal surgery a number of years ago for treatment of disc degenerative disease and spinal stenosis, who is passionate about being a part of this change and making people take notice of us as models with disabilities.

As we are a not for profit organisation, nothing that any of our team do is funded in any way, so in order for this tour and campaign to go ahead we are in need of support. As we all live in different parts of the UK, there will be substantial travel that needs to be funded so we can get this tour up and running. We are looking for organisations, businesses or individuals who can provide financial support to the tour to simply fund travel costs or indeed help us with travel in any way. We will have both local and national press coverage in each location which will be amazing publicity for any company wanting to help us. We will ensure your organisation/business receives credit in any press that we do, and can discuss brand promotion etc too if applicable. The cities we will be touring are; Liverpool, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Essex, Birmingham and Brighton (though we would love to add more cities depending on funding). In return for any support, we would also (where appropriate) provide ourselves as models for photo-shoot to promote your organisation, brand or products completely fee free.

Gemma Tour3

We have set up a ‘go fund me’ page (http://www.gofundme.com/vrusu7q), which any kind hearted individuals can make donations to. Literally we are truly grateful of any donation no matter how small or large. Please feel free to get in touch if you can help and please share to others, who you think may be interested in helping in any way:

 

Gemma@modelsofdiversity.org

Social media handles:

Twitter – @modsofdiversity

Instagram – @modelsofdiversity

#disabilityfight4fashionright

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Guest Article By Arthritis Digest – Blood test for fibromyalgia moves a step closer

Image credit: Kim Strømstad

Image credit: Kim Strømstad

New research from King’s College London could lead to a reliable blood test for fibromyalgia, experts claim.

The team will examine samples and measurements taken from 400 twin volunteers, in which one twin has chronic widespread pain. The samples will be compared with the DNA of the healthy twin to establish the differences and identify biomarkers in the DNA associated with the condition.

“Currently there’s no blood test for fibromyalgia, which makes diagnosis difficult,” explains Dr Frances Williams, lead researcher. “And treatment is limited, and in many cases unsatisfactory.

“Our research will help patients in two ways. First it’ll contribute to our understanding of how fibromyalgia – and other chronic pain syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome – develop, and point to pain pathways which we may not have suspected.

“Secondly, we hope it’ll lead to identification of a biomarker which we could work into a blood test.

“As well as enabling the condition to be diagnosed more effectively, it could help to ‘stratify’ patients into groups depending on disease severity, which will help in clinical trials of potential new treatments. It might even help us predict how the condition will progress.”

Fibromyalgia is common pain syndrome that causes muscle and bone pain, fatigue and disturbed sleep. It has no obvious physical cause and is difficult to diagnose, treat and manage.

Dr Natalie Carter, head of research liaison at Arthritis Research UK comments:

“Fibromyalgia is notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat, partly because we know so little about why it occurs and how it progresses. Being able to diagnose it would be a major step forward, and understanding more about the influence of genetics will allow us to develop treatments specifically for people with fibromyalgia in the future.”

Source: Arthritis Digest magazine, http://arthritisdigest.co.uk

Guest Blog – Gemma Flanagan, Model & Disability Rights Campaigner

Guillian Barre Recovery

Gemma undergoing rehabilitation

Ever since I was diagnosed with Guillain Barre Syndrome in 2011, I have wanted to try and use the horrendous experience that I and my family and friends went through in a positive way. When I was first in recovery and trying to rebuild my life, I was quite negative and down on everything and didn’t really feel like I was going to be able to help myself, never mind anyone else. But through looking on the internet for further information on Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) I came across the work of a fabulous charity which is now known as gain http://www.gaincharity.org.uk

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Gemma in Intensive Care

gain charity provide information, support and advice to individuals and their families who are affected by GBS and other associated autoimmune disorders and also help to provide awareness and further research into causes, treatments and preventions.

Through finding gain, I had not only found a way of helping myself; through having access to information etc, but also gave me a way to try and turn my experience back to a positive. I got in touch with them asking if there were any ways I could help or be of use to them. I was told about the helpline that is open 24/7 and is manned totally by volunteers, a lot of whom where GBS survivors like myself, or where relatives of people who had gone through something similar.

I loved this, as it wasn’t a case of doctors or medical professionals talking to you in a clinical way, this was people who could show true empathy with others about their situations. I had my first day on the helpline a few weeks later, and although I initially found it quite emotional, and difficult, it gave me a real sense of how much I had actually achieved and how much I had actually been through. Speaking to people over the phone who where at similar stages that I was at 6 months or so earlier was so surreal but I loved that I was able to offer some support and in some cases even advice on things that I had found useful or not when I was in hospital.

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Gemma supporting ‘gain’

Another form of help offered by gain is organising hospital visits if requested. I in particularly love this part, as I know how isolating, overwhelming and traumatic it is being stuck inside your body, often in agony and unable to move or communicate effectively. In my case I felt like it was never going to end and thought I would always be at that low point.  But through myself and others going into to see sufferers, showing them that there is life after GBS. Symptoms usually plateau and then things usually do improve, even if in some cases, like mine, it means that things are slightly different to how they where before. I had so many lovely messages and thanks from people who I have personally been in contact with through this, I am so proud and happy that I can be even the tiniest bit of help to them

As GBS and other associated disorders can affect individuals so differently, there is such a wide range of severity that they can take. In my case my worst was being completely paralysed and in intensive care for weeks, unable to even swallow or even close my eye lids, but as crazy as it sounds I now know how lucky I actually was. Things can always be so much worse, as the disorders are things that an be fatal in some cases. And even though I have been left with disabilities and complications as a result of everything, I am thankful and grateful that I am still here and now I am able to help others. I have so much amazing support from the best family and friends, who also have done their bit by raising money for gain, by doing crazy activities, running marathons and holding events. Charities such as gain do such an amazing job, but could always do more, if there were more funds available to them.

Guest Blog by Gemma Flanagan, model and disability campaigner

Gemma Flanagan

Image by Paul Cummings Photography

In 2011, I was loving life in my dream job, travelling the world as Cabin Crew, when I became ill with Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) & Miller Fisher Syndrome. I was left at my worst, completely paralysed, in intensive care and then remained in hospital and an intensive rehabilitation unit for a total of 9 months. I had to learn to do all basic tasks again and try to rebuild my body. I am now left with muscle / nerve damage and weakness in my core, hips, legs and back as a result of my GBS. It has left me reliant on a wheelchair and crutches to get around and has given me a whole new outlook on myself and life. I could no longer carry on my dream job or carry on with things how I used to, I had to come to terms with a totally new me and body.

After leaving hospital, I discovered an organisation called Models of Diversity, who are a not for profit organisation that campaign to get a greater representation of diversity within fashion and media. I had done modelling in the past, and always enjoyed it, I never imagined that I would be now pursuing a career as a disabled model. I had to come to terms with a totally new body image of myself, which has been hard, and Models of Diversity helped me to realise that I was still me, just in a slightly different body, with some new accessories!! Still a glamorous girl, who loves everything fashionable and fabulous.

Gemma Flanagan4

Image – Models of Diversity

I now campaign alongside Models of Diversity, to try to make change come about within fashion and media, as currently there is no permanent representation of people with disabilities, like myself, in fashion or media. There is such a strong population in the UK living with disabilities, that it is crazy that we are not represented. We still want to wear the clothes and use the products so why are we not included on a regular basis within adverts, marketing and media?!

I am so passionate about individuals and models with disabilities being represented within society. Change will happen, once people realise that as disabled models we are more than capable of holding our own within the fashion world and that we can produce just as high quality, captivating and sale-able images than any other models!!!

How Should We Care For Our Ageing And Disabled Population?

The Alf Morris Lecture Logo Colour 7

Many of us know what it is to be older, or to have a disability, because it has happened to us or to someone close to us. The Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) is a national charity providing impartial advice, information and training on independent living since 1969. The DLF website is a valuable resource for sourcing equipment and providing options to enable people to continue living independently at home.

The DLF has recently launched the Alf Morris Fund for Independent Living, which was set up to honour a man who made a difference to the most vulnerable members of society.

This Fund will help people find out about the resources available to keep them independent, and to help them make choices. Its purpose echoes Alf’s vision, in his own words, “adding life to years” rather than just years to life.

Known as the ‘quiet revolutionary’, Alf Morris, who died in 2012, became MP for Wythenshawe, then the world’s first Minister for Disabled People and later Lord Morris of Manchester.  A man of purpose and intent, Alf was a true social reformer who made a genuine and enduring difference to the world around him. His achievements included the passing of The Chronically Sick & Disabled Persons Act (1970), the first to recognise and give rights to disabled people. Adapted as a template by other nations, it transformed the lives of millions of disabled people in the UK and worldwide. And his legacy lives on.

“DLF’s mission to help older and disabled people live independently at home has long been my priority of priorities.  I believe there to be no worthier cause, nor one which makes such a tangible difference to so many lives.” The late Alf Morris who  had links with the DLF from 1969 and was its longest serving Vice-President,  remaining active in that role until his death in August 2012.

In support of the fund, the Alf Morris Lecture; Daring To Care: The Enduring Legacy Of Alf Morris Through The Eyes Of Sir Harold Evans, takes place at the Shaw Theatre, Euston Road, London at 7pm on Tuesday 10 March 2015

Sir-Harold-Evans-008

Sir Harold Evans

 

The inaugural Alf Morris Lecture will be delivered by renowned journalist, historian, writer and social commentator, Sir Harold Evans. Taking as its theme the issue of securing an independent and dignified future for our ageing population, the lecture covers one of the key debates in May’s General Election.

Sir Harold is no stranger to controversy. His distinguished career includes a 14 year stint as editor of the Sunday Times where he uncovered the thalidomide disaster and exposed Kim Philby as a Soviet spy.  He championed a style of investigative journalism that brought stories, scandals and social issues to public attention and his powerful influence changed the way civil cases were reported in Britain.  Now based in New York, Sir Harold is making a rare trip to the UK.

A personal story as well as a lecture, Sir Harold will share experiences and memories of his friendship with Alf Morris which began at Brookdale Park School in Manchester (where he was labelled ‘Poshie’ by Alf as he was the only boy in the school whose father owned a car) and was strengthened by their mutual quest to campaign for the victims of thalidomide.

Tickets for the Shaw Theatre, Euston Road London, on the evening of Tuesday 10 March 2015 start at £25 with concessions available. Guests can choose to attend a drinks reception before the lecture at 6.00pm and there will also be a celebratory dinner afterwards at 8.15pm in the Pullman St Pancras hotel (tables still available) with all monies raised donated to the Alf Morris Fund for Independent Living.

To buy a ticket, please call 020 7432 8006, email alfmorrislecture@dlf.org.uk  or visit www.alf-morris-lecture.org.uk

 

Product News – The Bradley Timepiece

Bradley Timepiece Beige 3

The Bradley Classic Timepiece

It is always a real pleasure to come across a product that is a great example of the principals of universal design such as The Bradley watch.  The Bradley, originally designed for Bradley Snyder, a US soldier who lost his sight in Afghanistan, also attracts a lot of interest from non-visually impaired people who love the stylish design.

Available HERE on our website.

Designed by Eone Time -Designed For Everyone  , The Bradley is a tactile watch with a retro style face that allows you to tell the time by sight and feel by using the raised markers that determine the hours, whilst two rotating ball bearings track the hours and the minutes.  It enables sighted users to tell the time discreetly, which can be incredibly useful for business meetings, social occasions or when you are in a dark theatre or cinema.

Eone Bradley watchThe Bradley’s namesake, Bradley Snyder is an ex US Naval Officer who lost his eyesight in a bomb explosion in 2011.  Bradley went on to compete in the London Paralympic Games and won Gold and Silver Medals in swimming. Along with other visually impaired users, Bradley supported Eone with invaluable feedback through the development stages of the timepiece.

The concept timepiece was put up for crowd funding and received almost $600,000 The Bradley has since been nominated for the Design Museum’s Design of the Year Award 2014; testament to its unique design and appeal.

The timepiece is a real fashion statement and can be a great talking point as it has such a unique look. These days, everyone has the time at the touch of a button, whether it is on your phone or iPad, but somehow digital will never be quite as sexy as the real thing. You may need to learn how to use The Bradley, which comes with a presentation box embossed with Braille which identifies the content and a user guide with both print and Braille.

Reviews of The Bradley Timepiece are available here:

http://www.sense.org.uk/content/product-review-bradley-timepiece?utm_source=Eone+Newsletter&utm_campaign=9adc8d2da0-June_2014_main_list_6_2_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f4843c244a-9adc8d2da0-

More information on The Bradley timepiece can be found HERE on our website.

Guest Blog by Move It or Lose it!

MIOLI (203)

We’re often told we have to exercise more and yet just the word can put people off! But what about the people who would like to exercise but can’t? The ones the fitness magazines with their six-packs and perfectly toned bodies often overlook? Those with disabilities and conditions which make getting out of bed, washed and dressed seem like running a marathon?

I’m used to trying to persuade the ‘reluctant’ to exercise – I was a secondary school PE teacher! Now I’m teaching people who would love to exercise but think they can’t, or have problems which prevent them from accessing traditional forms of exercise.

After retraining to teach exercise for older people and those with disabilities, I soon realised that all the theory in the world counts for nothing if people don’t enjoy themselves. Coming along to a class, especially when you’re fearful of what to expect or of doing more harm than good, is a giant leap of faith, so creating an atmosphere of inclusivity and warmth is vital. Then you can start to focus on doing exercises which will help with everyday life.

 

MIOLI (202)

So, how did it all begin? Well I began to set up classes in the West Midlands for older people and those with health problems. I specialise in chair-based exercise which is ideal for less mobile people as they’re still able to join in and improve their fitness. But, key to my success, is making the routines so much fun that they don’t even realise they’re exercising.

Everyone who came to my classes couldn’t believe how much they enjoyed themselves and how much they could improve just by working out in chair! They were desperate to continue the exercises by working out at home too. So, I was persuaded to make a DVD of the exercises. They helped with the choice of music, got involved with the filming and they even came up with the name –Move it or Lose it!  It was vital to make the exercise routines safe, enjoyable, effective and accessible to everyone whatever their ability. Our DVDs are made by real people for real people and all endorsed by The Centre for Healthy Ageing Research (at the University of Birmingham).

Despite the success of all 5 of my DVDs and the amazing customer feedback I get, I know nothing can compare to a class! The benefits of working out in a group are endless – the camaraderie, friendship, motivation and support they all offer one another is fantastic! Each class becomes a little community, which is so lovely to see when all you hear in the press is the loneliness and social isolation that many older adults face in today’s society.

I know there’s still a desperate need for more classes across the UK, so I’ve set my sights on spreading the magic of Move it or Lose it! into more local communities. I get countless letters and emails from customers asking where their local classes are. So, with the Centre for Healthy Ageing Research, we’re now training more people and translating the latest research ensuring our Chair-based exercise instructors are part of a highly respected network. We’re looking for more people who are passionate about helping older adults to stay fit for life! Empathy, humour and patience are all a must! But, it’s the most rewarding job, seeing people who think they can’t do something actually achieve success so they can live life to the full.

Find out more about Move it or Lose it! at www.moveitorloseit.co.uk/careers or call 0800 612 7785.

By Julie Robinson, Move it or Lose it!