Tag Archives: paralysis

How To Put On Your Top & Derby Compression Socks

Medical socks for tired legs

Top & Derby Compression Socks

By the pure nature of the tight fit, compression socks can be tricky to put on but there is an easy and straight forward technique to make this process easy.

Start by putting your hand inside the sock and finding the heel pocket. Once you have found the heel, grab the material and slowly pull the sock inside-out, keeping hold of the heel material the whole time. The foot of the sock should now be on the inside of the sock and you are ready to put it on.

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Top & Derby Compression Socks

Whilst in a seated position, rest your foot on the edge of the seat and put your foot inside the compression sock. Start to feed the inside-out compression sock over your foot until you reach the end of the foot  and your heel is in the heel pocket.

Go to the top cuff of the sock and slowly stretch it apart and pull it over the foot and pull it up over the leg until the sock is in place and the cuff is just below the knee. Then go back and smooth out any wrinkles.  Adjust the heel if necessary and you are ready to go!

Wearing compression socks can help improve circulation and reduce swelling of the ankles and feet due to health conditions like diabetes, paralysis, peripheral edema etc. Foot, leg and ankle swelling can also be caused by certain medication, pregnancy, air travel, obesity and sometimes it can just be from being on your feet all day, particularly in warm weather.  While swelling in the lower extremities usually isn’t cause for concern, it can sometimes be a sign of something more serious, in which case you should talk to your doctor.

The demonstration video is also available to watch here:

More information on Top & Derby compression socks can be found on our website designed2enable.co.uk 

Product News: Treat-Eezi Pressure Sore Mattress Topper

 

Treat-Eezi Pressure Sore Mattress Overlay

Treat-Eezi Pressure Sore Mattress Overlay

Pressure ulcers or bed sores are an injury that breaks down the skin and underlying tissue. They are caused when an area of skin is placed under pressure and the circulation to that area is restricted.

People over the age of 70, are more likely to develop a pressure sore as they have restricted mobility and ageing skin. Those with type 2 diabetes, spinal injury and other health conditions are particularly vulnerable to pressure sores. Pressure ulcers can range in severity from patches of discoloured skin to open wounds that expose the underlying bone or muscle. Once they have developed, pressure sores are incredibly hard to treat and repair can take months.

Pressure ulcer mattress

Pressure ulcer mattress

Prevention of pressure sores is therefore the best approach and the new Treat-Eezi Mattress has been designed to be compact, portable and comfortable. Treat-Eezi is deceptively soft but provides the correct cushioning and pressure relieving support. The breathable fabric technology regulates the body’s temperature and wicks away moisture, reducing the problems of friction and chaffing caused by sweating.

The thousands of polyester fibres in the multiple layers of the Treat-Eezi pad combine to conform to the natural body contours in both supine and seated positions thereby offering pressure relief well below that of normal capillary blood flow hence skin breakdown and shearing, plus friction are simply diminished.

Treat-Eezi also doubles as a chair pad for additional protection whilst seated. We recommend that pad is folded and always used on a foam based chair.

Further information on Treat-Eezi Pressure Sore Mattress Topper can be found HERE

 

Guest Blog by Gemma Flanagan, model and disability campaigner

Gemma Flanagan

Image by Paul Cummings Photography

In 2011, I was loving life in my dream job, travelling the world as Cabin Crew, when I became ill with Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) & Miller Fisher Syndrome. I was left at my worst, completely paralysed, in intensive care and then remained in hospital and an intensive rehabilitation unit for a total of 9 months. I had to learn to do all basic tasks again and try to rebuild my body. I am now left with muscle / nerve damage and weakness in my core, hips, legs and back as a result of my GBS. It has left me reliant on a wheelchair and crutches to get around and has given me a whole new outlook on myself and life. I could no longer carry on my dream job or carry on with things how I used to, I had to come to terms with a totally new me and body.

After leaving hospital, I discovered an organisation called Models of Diversity, who are a not for profit organisation that campaign to get a greater representation of diversity within fashion and media. I had done modelling in the past, and always enjoyed it, I never imagined that I would be now pursuing a career as a disabled model. I had to come to terms with a totally new body image of myself, which has been hard, and Models of Diversity helped me to realise that I was still me, just in a slightly different body, with some new accessories!! Still a glamorous girl, who loves everything fashionable and fabulous.

Gemma Flanagan4

Image – Models of Diversity

I now campaign alongside Models of Diversity, to try to make change come about within fashion and media, as currently there is no permanent representation of people with disabilities, like myself, in fashion or media. There is such a strong population in the UK living with disabilities, that it is crazy that we are not represented. We still want to wear the clothes and use the products so why are we not included on a regular basis within adverts, marketing and media?!

I am so passionate about individuals and models with disabilities being represented within society. Change will happen, once people realise that as disabled models we are more than capable of holding our own within the fashion world and that we can produce just as high quality, captivating and sale-able images than any other models!!!